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US power after 11 September: increasing international security

Doyle, John and Connolly, Eileen (2003) US power after 11 September: increasing international security. Working Papers in International Studies Series. (Paper No. 2003-1). Centre for International Studies, Dublin City University, Ireland.

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Abstract

Since the attacks on the United States of America on September 11th 2001 the US has chosen a strongly unilateral foreign policy underscored and effectively sustained by military power. In the immediate aftermath of the attack on the US it was speculated that American desire to build an international coalition against terrorism and to take military action in sensitive areas would lead it to engage in dialogue with its potential allies in both the developed and developing worlds. This did not prove to be the case as the US displayed a willingness to act in opposition to the international community and to back up its foreign policy decisions with force if necessary. This article analyses the current international role of the US and the impact US actions have on the emerging system of international governance. While the US is undoubtedly dominant, and their actions in the international arena have undermined the effectiveness of the United Nations, they have faced unprecedented opposition to their policy on Iraq, have not been able to prevent initiatives such as the International Criminal Court or to win widespread international support, in either the industrialised states or among the developing world for their actions. This indicates a reduction in US hegemony and also an increase in international insecurity as US foreign policy action aimed at securing a narrowing defined American national interest leads to growing polarisation in the international system.

Item Type:Working Paper (No. 2003-1)
Refereed:No
Uncontrolled Keywords:Foreign policy; United States of America; September 11 2001;
Subjects:Social Sciences > International relations
Social Sciences > Terrorism
Social Sciences > Political science
DCU Faculties and Centres:Research Initiatives and Centres > Centre for International Studies (CIS) > Working Papers in International Studies Series
Publisher:Centre for International Studies, Dublin City University
Use License:This item is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License. View License
ID Code:2117
Deposited On:11 Nov 2008 12:32 by DORAS Administrator. Last Modified 19 Nov 2008 14:26

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