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Consumer ethnocentrism and conspicuousness of South African imports in Mozambique

John, Anna (2011) Consumer ethnocentrism and conspicuousness of South African imports in Mozambique. PhD thesis, Dublin City University.

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Abstract

Focus of the study The study examines the nature and effects of consumer ethnocentrism and conspicuousness of imports on consumer reactions toward South African products in Mozambique. Purpose The purpose of the study is threefold: (1) to indicate those groups of Mozambican consumers who are more ethnocentric and who see greater conspicuousness in South African imports; (2) to indicate those groups of consumers whose consumer ethnocentric responses to South African versus Mozambican products and brands are stronger; and (3) to indicate those categories of South African versus Mozambican products and brands which bring up stronger negative reactions among consumers in the Mozambican market. Methodology Products The study focuses on food consumables. The selected products include potatoes, chicken meat, tea, juice, biscuits and beer. They are classified into agricultural and processed items. Instrument The instrument consisted of two parts. The first comprised the scales of consumer ethnocentric tendencies, conspicuousness of South African imports, attitudes toward the product, attitudes toward the brand and purchasing intentions toward the brand. All the scales had good psychometric qualities in the Mozambican context. The second part contained demographic questions. Sample A questionnaire-based survey was used to collect data from 448 students in the southern part of Mozambique. Data analyses The data was analysed by using such quantitative techniques as structural equation modelling (LISREL 8.8), one sample t-tests, one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and one-way repeated measures analysis of covariance (SPSS15). Findings The nature of consumer ethnocentric tendencies was defined by age, gender, national subgroup and employment status. The same predictors shaped conspicuousness of 15 South African imports. The phenomena of consumer ethnocentrism and conspicuousness of South African imports were positively correlated. By and large, consumer ethnocentrism predicted negative reactions to South African imports at the product level. Yet, it did not manifest at the brand level. In a similar manner, conspicuousness of South African imports activated only at the product level as it had a significant positive impact on attitudes towards South African food consumables but had no influence upon attitudes and purchasing intentions towards South African brands of food consumables. Regarding moderating effects, the demographic characteristics—age, gender, national subgroup and employment status—did not explain consumer ethnocentric effects. Also, consumer reactions to imports vary across product categories. Imports which threaten domestic alternatives of high national importance evoke greater resentment among consumers. Consumers were prone to reject imports of South African agricultural food consumables because those represented a threat to the output of a highly important economic sector in Mozambique—agriculture. However, Mozambicans were more tolerant of South African processed food imports which competed with the produce of a less important national economic sector—processed food industry. Finally, the impact of product type on consumer reactions to imports was moderated by consumer ethnocentric tendencies. That is, the magnitude of the effect was greater among ethnocentric consumers. Compared to the non-ethnocentric population, ethnocentric consumers feel stronger resentment to those categories of imports which threaten domestic alternatives of high national importance. Theoretical contributions The study makes a series of contributions to the substantive theories of consumer ethnocentrism and conspicuous consumption of imports. In addition to this, it suggests several frameworks and models which might be useful for further analysis of the two phenomena. Practical implications The study advises Mozambican and South African practitioners groups of more loyal consumers. It indicates product categories which may enhance competitiveness of South African and national suppliers in the Mozambican market. It also points out those categories of food consumables which deserve greater attention.

Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Date of Award:November 2011
Refereed:No
Supervisor(s):Brady, Malcolm
Uncontrolled Keywords:Consumer Ethnocentrism; Conspicuous Consumption; Mozambique; South Africa; food consumables
Subjects:UNSPECIFIED
DCU Faculties and Centres:DCU Faculties and Schools > DCU Business School
Use License:This item is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License. View License
ID Code:16637
Deposited On:01 Dec 2011 10:59 by Rachel Keegan. Last Modified 22 Sep 2013 04:02

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