Browse DORAS
Browse Theses
Search
Latest Additions
Creative Commons License
Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is licensed for use under a:

A quality software process for rapid application development

Coleman, Gerry (1997) A quality software process for rapid application development. Master of Science thesis, Dublin City University.

Full text available as:

[img]PDF - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
3261Kb

Abstract

Having a defined and documented standardised software process, together with the appropriate techniques and tools to measure its effectiveness, offers the potential to software producers to improve the quality of their output. Many firms have yet to define their own software process. Yet without a defined process it is impossible to measure success or focus on how development capability can be enhanced. To date, a number of software process improvement frameworks have been developed and implemented. However, most of these models have been targeted at large-scale producers. Furthermore, they have applied to companies operating using traditional development techniques. Smaller companies and those operating in development areas where speed of delivery is paramount have not, as yet, had process improvement paradigms available for adoption. This study examined the software process in a small company and emerged with the recommendation of the use of the Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM) and the Personal Software Process (PSP) for achieving software process improvement. DSDM has been designed as a framework for Rapid Application Development (RAD) and provides a documented approach for organisations to follow when undertaking RAD projects. Through the mechanisms outlined by DSDM developers become empowered and time-to-market for software can be substantially reduced. The PSP allows individual software engineers to assess, measure and improve their performance. By improving the skills of individual developers, quality can be engineered into RAD projects at all life-cycle stages. Combining PSP and DSDM, therefore, enables the production of high-quality software and at the same time allows reductions in development time to be achieved.

Item Type:Thesis (Master of Science)
Date of Award:1997
Refereed:No
Supervisor(s):Verbruggen, Renaat
Uncontrolled Keywords:Application software Development; Computer Programming
Subjects:Computer Science > Computer software
Computer Science > Software engineering
DCU Faculties and Centres:DCU Faculties and Schools > Faculty of Engineering and Computing > School of Computing
Use License:This item is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License. View License
ID Code:18419
Deposited On:17 Jul 2013 14:54 by Celine Campbell. Last Modified 20 Oct 2014 15:52

Download statistics

Archive Staff Only: edit this record