Browse DORAS
Browse Theses
Search
Latest Additions
Creative Commons License
Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is licensed for use under a:

Why do governments delegate authority to quasi-autonomous agencies? The case of independent administrative authorities in France.

Elgie, Robert (2006) Why do governments delegate authority to quasi-autonomous agencies? The case of independent administrative authorities in France. Governance, 19 (2). pp. 207-227. ISSN 0952-1895

Full text available as:

[img]Microsoft Word
125Kb

Abstract

In recent years, there has been a considerable degree of delegation from governments to quasi-autonomous agencies. Various reasons have been put forward to explain why governments decide to delegate authority in this way (Thatcher 2002, 129-139). Some reasons are based on a transactions cost approach, such as credible commitments. Other reasons are more contextual. For instance, governments may be responding to a process of cross-national policy transfer. In the literature on delegation some hypotheses have already been tested. Specifically, Gilardi (2002) has found evidence to suggest that governments create agencies to credibly commit to particular policy choices. However, other hypotheses, particularly ones based on contextual explanations, have proved much more difficult to operationalise. This article aims to help fill this gap. It does so by focusing on the creation of Independent Administrative Authorities (Autorités administratives indépendantes - AAIs) in France. We examine the reasons for their creation. Why have successive governments created so many AAIs in the last couple of decades? Does the qualitative evidence in this particular case corroborate the quantitative studies that have been undertaken elsewhere? What does the French example tell us about the more general literature on delegation?

Item Type:Article (Published)
Refereed:Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords:delegation of powers; regulatory commissions; non-governmental organisations;
Subjects:Social Sciences > Political science
DCU Faculties and Centres:Research Initiatives and Centres > Centre for International Studies (CIS)
DCU Faculties and Schools > Faculty of Humanities and Social Science > School of Law and Government
Publisher:Blackwell Publishing
Official URL:http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=20069234&site=ehost-live
Use License:This item is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License. View License
ID Code:61
Deposited On:14 Dec 2006 by DORAS Administrator. Last Modified 30 Jan 2009 12:12

Download statistics

Archive Staff Only: edit this record